Cirque’s remarkable 3-D Costume Printer

June 2, 2017 Richasi

Kooza is the first Cirque du Soleil show to have a 3D printer in the wardrobe department.

The art of costume design has remained mostly unchanged for centuries, its history writ with needle and thread, but it is now just one of many industries being revolutionized by 3-D printing.

The Perth season of Cirque du Soleil’s Kooza production features costumes made using a 3-D printer, the first time the Cirque has used the technology in its wardrobe department.

A VIDEO ON THIS PROCESS
https://goo.gl/yt19qc

Kooza head of wardrobe Jason Brass said the printer allowed costume pieces, such as the King’s crown, which previously took 60 hours to make in Montreal, to be fabricated in Perth in 16 hours.

The handmade crowns had a lifespan of about four months, while these new iterations last two years and are made from recyclable material.

Typically, Brass’ department would spend eight hours a day, six days a week, on costume maintenance but the 3-D printer has reduced that to just eight hours in total for a 10-week Kooza season.

“So far it’s been working like a dream,” Brass said.

Of course, many pieces still require a human touch — Cirque employs local artisans for each show — but the possibilities of 3-D printing in bamboo, silver and plastic are endless in the hands of such creative people.

{ SOURCE: The West Australian | https://goo.gl/yt19qc }

The post Cirque’s remarkable 3-D Costume Printer appeared first on Fascination! Newsletter.

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